Wednesday, February 14, 2007

Yma Sumac: Inca Princess



Peruvian vocalist Yma Sumac, arrived in the US in the 1950s, introducing the country to exotica. Her unique voice that shot in its peak five octaves, brought her success worldwide.

Contrary to urban legend, her real name is not Amy Camus (Yma Sumac spelled backwords), and she was not born in Brooklyn. She is Peruvian, and claims to descend from a line of Inca royalty.

See the Yma Sumac Wiki.
RENEGADE EYE

14 comments:

Truth-Pain said...

Wow! Her vocal timbre is unreal,... I know a little about such nuances as I am vocalist myself.... what a rippin' voice. Tone, depth, range....
Thanks for turning me on to yet another unknown gem. Love your site,...

GraemeAnfinson said...

Very unique voice, i love. It has been a while since a post on music, I was missing them

Anonymous said...

Seems like an amalgamation of sounds and styles...Can you hear the charango? Unique post Ren, as ususal.

The flying monkeys (having difficulty logging on)

jams o donnell said...

strange that is another comment that has flown off into teh wild blue yonder. I had never knowingly heart anythin by her before. It matters not if she is of inca royal descent it was very enjoyable.

Puppeteer said...

Intresting.
I noticed she even went to Bucharest, my first home. I'm flattered.

Puppeteer said...

By the way, thanks for your remark on Fowles. Ever since I've fallen to his writings, I take everything related to him quite personaly.
I saw once "The French Lieutenant's Woman", after reading his Mantissa, but didn't know it was his.
I'm planning to read "The Magus" next. Any insights?

Puppeteer said...

Me again!

This is eloquence, by Western Media Standards. But Junblat had always been a clown, don't mind him.

"The Scarlet Letter", is it good?
And what do you think of Rushdie? I've read some controversial things about him recently, although he made me a rather good impression with his "East, West". I wanted to hear more opinions, as I know you enjoy a good read.
Thanx.

artie said...

Wow! I love her! What a goddess.

Renegade Eye said...

"The Scarlet Letter" is for its time something as a soap opera would be today.

I've never read Rushdie.

I'm reading Isaac Deutscher's Stalin biography.

adarna said...

amazing! love her voice. thanks for introducing her.

and you should go get a copy of rushdie. he's one of my all-time favorites. :)

ella said...

Wonderful clip. I can't believe I have never heard of Yma. She reminds me of Astrud Gilberto, who I believe came after Yma and was Brazilian. Perhaps Astrud was inspired by Yma.

Redwine said...

I'm glad you posted this, Ren. I know Yma Sumac, had most available from her on vynil, as a child. Piazzola
(you mentioned Muerte del Angel, also one of my favorites, ever.

But The Scarlet letter as a soap? Can't agree. and won't, Pupeteer, don;t listen to Ren, read it

Renegade Eye said...

I didn't mean soap opera as a put down. "The Scarlet Letter" was the "Peyton Place" of its time.

Charlie Pottins said...

Great! I remember Yma Sumac on UK radio variety shows in my childhood years. Only remember one number mind, but vocal range always impressed.
Few years ago though I was talking to a neighbour from Peru, quite an educated lady who taught at the local college, but she had never heard of Yma. Made me wonder if the singer was what she said. Or could just be a case of sic transit gloria, I suppose, as this woman was probably too young to remember.
Can't see the connection someone made with Astrid Giberto, mind. I'm a fan of Astrid, and Carlos Jobim, but to my musically uneducated ear her voice is characterised by its lightness of touch, and subtlety of expression, and what is also good is her phrasing.