Wednesday, July 05, 2006

Nepalese Maoists Join New Government and Disarm

The Communist Party of Nepal (Maoist) reached an eight-point agreement to join the new government of Nepal. The Maoists signed an agreement with Prime Minister Girija Prasad Koirala, under the plan, the current parliament will be dissolved to make way for an interim administration that will include the CPN (M) and will operate under an interim constitution, which is currently being drafted. By May next year, elections will take place for a “constituent assembly” that will establish a new permanent constitution.

During an interview last week for state-run television, CPN (M) leader Prachanda declared that he would stand aside as supreme commander of his army once a new interim government was formed. “We are ready to put our army under the new prime minister. Then the guerrilla army would become the national army and no longer remain the Maoist army,” he said. No mechanisms have been spelt out, however.

Prime Minister Koirala said he wants the new government, to be a constitutional monarchy. That remark sparked protests, including of the Maoists. They hinted they will accept, whatever comes from the referendum.

India played a role, in calling on King Gyanendra, to step down. They see the incorporation of the Maoists into the government, as a model for how to handle Naxalites, their Maoist guerilla movement.

I sent a copy of the article, to Vidrohi at My Red Diary. His response: What Crap!

Maoists have joined the government because the government has agreed to call elections to the constituent assembly. Maoists want, and correctly so, to be a part of the processes that would lead up to the formation of the constituent assembly. Once the constituent assembly is called, if the Maoists are in majority, and there are chances that they would be because of their massive political support, they would be able to force their constitutional framework, which may be socialist.

CPN(m) have made very wise decisions.

Denouncement of CPN(m) is the most expected behavior from the Trotskyite circles, who have always opposed all revolutionary changes, except for one.

For the cause,
Vidrohi


Be sure to read: World Socialist Web Site Article About Nepal.RENEGADE EYE

31 comments:

Daniel Hoffmann-Gill said...

I come to you to turn me onto events outside of my usual frames of reference and you never fail me.

Thanks.

Dave Marlow said...

Having only read what you've said here it sounds like the people of Nepal are doing a pretty good job in gradually reforming the nation into probably more of a socialist nation (as opposed to a communist one). Rest assured I will continue to track this very interesting story. Thanks Renegade!

-Comrade Dave
http://theredmantis.blogspot.com/

CB said...

Obrador loses, the poor and disenfranchised of Mexico at least have a fighting chance.

Renegade Eye said...

CB is smirking so much, he missed we are talking about Nepal.

Obrador can do better as the opposition. The structure of the Mexican govt. is so full of corruption, nothing will be accomplished. He lost by a hair, even his opposition acknowledges that.

sonia said...

Nepal is now where Afghanistan was in 1972. Thirty years from now, Nepal will be a pack of smoldering ruins. Apparently, it's their turn to suffer... unless the Nepalese people wake up and slaughter all the Maoists in their mist...

CB said...

Sonia is correct as usual. Ren, I agree the Mex gov. is completely corrupt.

Renegade Eye said...

CB: To rid the Mexican govt. of corruption, it'll more than elected bourgeoise candidate.

Sonia: Your vacation didn't mellow you much. I expect the Maoists to be, the greatest defenders of the system. Once they are incorporated, you will hear from them, "what are Naxalites"?

El Güero said...

Interesting. I hope Nepal can make a successful transition to a viable government that serves the people.

As for Obrador...I just read news report that shows him with a slight lead in the recount...hopefully that trend will continue.

Tina said...

Well, I guess now the US will just have to ask for more "insurgency relevant aid" from the Agency for International Development so that the flow of AK-47s, M-16s & Uzis can be continued in Nepal, no?

And the corporate whores are dancing the tarantella because their good buddy Calderon will ensure that that the flow of exploited illegals to the US continues... because Heaven knows they shouldn't have to have pay out a fair wage/ compensation for a hard day's labor, should they?

thepoetryman said...

Maoists want, and correctly so, to be a part of the processes that would lead up to the formation of the constituent assembly.

Many in this country are now wanting the same!

roman said...

If the information in the post is correct and both sides are in agreement to form a new coalition government, then what is the problem? This is exactly how political disputes should be resolved, by negotiation, agreements and finally by referendum.
A constitutional monarchy is fairly typical and familiar to people in this part of the world and should not be discounted at this point.
I see better days for the Nepalese people because of the willingness to negotiate.

celticfire said...

Hiyya Trots!

I just finished an interview with Roxanne-Dunbar-Ortiz.

A veteran activist and scholar, the author of Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War, Outlaw Woman: A Memoir of the War Years, 1960-1975, and Red Dirt: Growing up Okie. She has played important roles in a number of movements and struggles around the world, including the women's liberation movement, the American Indian Movement (AIM), and has fought for self-determination among various people's around the world.

Her writings have appeared in numerous human rights, international law, and history journals as well as such publications Monthly Review, and on the CounterPunch website.

Check it out:

http://celticfire.blogspot.com/2006/07/interview-with-roxanne-dunbar-ortiz-by.html

beatroot said...

Sonia likening Napal now to Afghanistan in 1972 is bizarre, to say the least.

1972, Afghanistan was one year before the coup by an unelected brother of an unelected King.

Nepal today is after a coup by an unelected member of an unelected royal family (or what was left of it after a bit of monarchal fratecide).

The ‘Maoists’ joining the government was predicted just after the election last year that took back much of the power the Nepalese had taken away from them by their unelected head of state. They have joined the democratic process just as they said they would.

Nepal is now in the hands of elected representatives. For a person who goes on, ad nauseam, about democracy and freedom not to welcome that shows a very confused set of political principles indeed.

sonia said...

Beatroot,

All right, Mr.'I Need An Exact Date'...

Nepal is now where Afghanistan was in 1974... Happy now ?

But 1972 or 1974, Nepal is heading in exactly the same direction as Afghanistan. The trajectory will be painful - the monarchy will be overthown, replaced first by a moderate socialist government, and then by a totalitarian one.

Unless some miracle happens...

beatroot said...

The big missing piece in the Afghanistan analogy, Sonia, is that Nepal needs an invasion by a superpower to really rally the troops, cause a civil was, energize reactionary forces.

Afghanis got the Soviets.

But we can't expect the US to invade and occupy a poor third world country, now can we? That would be unprecedented. Wouldn't it?

sonia said...

Burma was never invaded by anybody and it's still one of the most oppressive dictatorships in the world...

Always blaming foreigners...

troutsky said...

And what does Sonia blame? Ill bet on "human nature".Could she also analyze the situation in Thailand, a crony capitalism based on "democratic" constitutionalism combined with a "monarchical network",as existing completely independent of outside interference? Couldnt we blame outsiders a little? Hint: WTO, IMF.

the flying monkeys said...

Thanks for the post.

glenda said...

You have the news covered that I never see anywhere else. Thanks for broadening my world.

sonia said...

And what does Sonia blame?

Revolutionary radicalism, actually. As for Thailand, despite its faults, it's one of the most successful Third World countries, doing far better economically and politically than any country infected by revolutionary radicalism.

CrazyComposer (aka Peter Amsel) said...

Perhaps the Maoists decided to join the government in the hopes (perhaps misguided, that is for the judgement of hindsight) that legitimate elections will eventually take place and the people will finally have the government they deserve (so long as the elections are fair, and Bush isn't elected).

Of course, I could be mistaken ... I recall a time, back in university, when I was mistaken about something like this ... nah, I'm not.

Truth-Pain said...

I hope you dont mind my linking your very fine blog in my latest Posting. Kudos, it is always a time well spent here.

Renegade Eye said...

Welcome truth-pain. Things won't be dull, when you add comments.

I find it hard to understand, why liberals visiting soldiers in the hospitals, bothers you?

Nicholas said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Nicholas said...

In response to beatroot:

The Soviets did not cause fundamentalist reaction, it was already in its kernal and US imperialism was the manure and the water that helped it to grow and grow into what we have seen in the last decades.

In response to a generalized "Communist" line that seems to defend any action that the party undertakes I would encourage caution in concluding that the Stalinist parties are not seeking class collaboration. Their first goal should be the accomplishmentof the bourgeois democratic revolution and the overthrow of the monarchy and any aristocracy and landed church power. This much even western liberals should agree on.

beatroot said...

The Soviets did not cause fundamentalist reaction, it was already in its kernal and US imperialism was the manure and the water that helped it to grow and grow...

Don;t be silly.

The Societ invasion of Afghanistan started a new phase where all sorts of muslims 'radicalized', found a cause and a devil.

Next up was the Balkans war, particularly in Bosnia.

Then we had the invasion of Afghanistan and then Iraq by the US 'coalition'.

Nicholas seems to see the world through the eyes of someone who thinks 'US bad Soviets not so bad.

And that's just silly.

Datingmaster, Jerusalem said...

clemkeveryone come over for kosher kama sutra. oh yeah!

Nicholas said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Nicholas said...

Sorry beatroot but "silly" does not count as arguement. To be fair maybe you are not as familiar as others with the history of US imperialism and the interests it serves of maintaining the world wide exploitation of workers by capitalists through subverting any and all efforts by workers to change the system. I will endevour to write a post outlining a little of this history on my blog soon, which could mean as long as a month or more.

Second do you realize that the US armed and financially backed the "radicalized" Muslims you talk about, and seem to dislike so much? Compared to them, both absolutely and relatively, the Red Army was a progressive force.

Anonymous said...

I recently interviewed a comrade who visited Nepal to work on the Martyrs Road. You can read the article at the link below.

Pat C

http://www.indymedia.ie/article/76924

Anonymous said...

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